Pregnancy Care Tips you should know

Pregnancy Care Tips you should know 3

What is Pregnancy?

Pregnancy, also known as gestation, is the time during which one or more offspring develops inside a woman. Multiple pregnancies involve more than one offspring, such as with twins. A pregnancy may end in a live birth, a spontaneous miscarriage, an induced abortion, or a stillbirth. Childbirth typically occurs around 40 weeks from the start of the last menstrual period (LMP). This is just over nine months – (gestational age) where each month averages 31 days. When using fertilization age it is about 38 weeks. An embryo is a developing offspring during the first eight weeks following fertilization, (ten weeks gestational age) after which, the term fetus is used until birth. Signs and symptoms of early pregnancy may include missed periods, tender breasts, nausea and vomiting, hunger, and frequent urination. Pregnancy may be confirmed with a pregnancy test.

Pregnancy is divided into three trimesters, each lasting for approximately 3 months. The first trimester includes conception, which is when the sperm fertilizes the egg. The fertilized egg then travels down the fallopian tube and attaches to the inside of the uterus, where it begins to form the embryo and placenta. During the first trimester, the possibility of miscarriage (natural death of an embryo or fetus) is at its highest. Around the middle of the second trimester, the movement of the fetus may be felt. At 28 weeks, more than 90% of babies can survive outside of the uterus if provided with high-quality medical care
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Problems Women Face During Pregnancy

Morning sickness

Morning sickness or nausea (with or without vomiting) is a common symptom of early pregnancy that is caused by changes in hormones.

Backache in pregnancy

There are several things you can do to help prevent backache from happening during your pregnancy and to help you cope with an aching back if it does occur.

Bladder and bowel problems during pregnancy

During pregnancy, many women experience some rather unpleasant conditions. Maintaining a healthy diet and doing regular exercise can help make life a little easier.

Changes to hair during pregnancy

Hormonal changes during pregnancy can make your hair thicker or thinner. Learn about these changes and whether you can dye hair while pregnant.

Changes to your skin during pregnancy

As your pregnancy develops, you may find that you experience changes to your skin and hair.

Dealing with fatigue during your pregnancy

Feeling tired, a bit faint, and hotter than usual is quite common during pregnancy, and it’s all down to your hormones.

Headaches during pregnancy

Many women find that they experience headaches at various stages of their pregnancy. Find out what can help improve some of the symptoms.

Indigestion and heartburn in pregnancy

Find out how to recognize, avoid, and treat indigestion and heartburn during your pregnancy.

Leg cramps during pregnancy

Leg cramps are a normal but sometimes uncomfortable part of your pregnancy. Find out how to treat and help prevent leg cramps.

Swelling during pregnancy

Swollen ankles and feet are very common during pregnancy. Find out how you can help relieve some of the discomforts and know whether any symptoms are serious.

Feeling hot in pregnancy

You’re likely to feel warmer than usual during pregnancy. This is due to hormonal changes and an increase in blood supply to the skin. You’re also likely to sweat more.

Incontinence in pregnancy

Incontinence is a common problem during and after pregnancy. Pregnant women are sometimes unable to prevent a sudden spurt of pee or a small leak when they cough, laugh, sneeze, move suddenly, or just get up from a sitting position.

This may be temporary because the pelvic floor muscles (the muscles around the bladder) relax slightly to prepare for the baby’s delivery.

 

Exercise to do During Pregnancy

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Aerobic exercise

Aerobic exercise is any activity that makes your heart beat faster. This includes brisk walking, swimming, and various classes that you do to music. If you’re new to aerobic exercise, start off slowly and gradually build up to a maximum of four half-hour sessions a week.

Cycling

Cycling is a great low-impact aerobic exercise. However, as your bump grows, your balance will change, which could mean you are more likely to fall off. If you’re used to cycling, you should be safe to carry on, but if you begin to feel less stable than usual it may be best to stay off your bike or switch to a stationary bike until after your baby is born. Using a stationary exercise bike in the gym or as part of a group session is fine.

Pilates

The aim of Pilates is to improve balance, strength, flexibility, and posture. It could help your body cope with carrying the extra weight of your growing baby, as well as preparing you for childbirth and recovering afterward.

Running

If you were a runner or jogger before you got pregnant, it’s safe and healthy to continue during your pregnancy as long as you feel okay. Your baby will not be harmed by the impact or the movement. Running is a great aerobic workout.

Strength exercises

Strength training exercises are exercises that make your muscles stronger. They include swimming, working with weights, walking uphill and digging the garden. It’s a good way to keep your muscles toned during pregnancy.

Swimming

Exercising in water supports your bump and won’t strain your back. It’s a great way to get your heart rate up without putting extra stress on your joints and ligaments.

Aqua natal classes are popular and can be a fun way to meet other mums-to-be.

Walking

Walking is a great basis for pregnancy fitness and you can do it for the whole nine months if you feel comfortable. Walking is free and it’s available on your doorstep. If you’re not used to exercising, walking is a great place to start.

Yoga

Yoga is an activity that focuses on mental and physical wellbeing. It uses a series of body positions (called postures) and breathing exercises. Pregnancy yoga uses relaxation and breathing techniques with postures that are adapted for pregnancy.

 

Don’t overdo any Exercise during Pregnancy

Avoid pushing yourself too hard as this can make you overheat, which is not good for your baby. You should aim to work hard enough so that you breathe more deeply and your heart beats faster, but not so hard that you can’t pass the talk test. You should be able to hold a conversation without gasping for breath. If you’re doing an exercise class or working out in the gym, tell the teacher or gym instructor you’re pregnant and ask their advice about checking your heart rate

 

Foods to Eat During Pregnancy

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Dairy products

During pregnancy, you need to consume extra protein and calcium to meet the needs of your growing little one. Dairy products like milk, cheese, and yogurt should be on the docket. Dairy products contain two types of high-quality protein: casein and whey. Dairy is the best dietary source of calcium and provides high amounts of phosphorus, B vitamins, magnesium, and zinc. Yogurt, especially Greek yogurt, contains more calcium than most other dairy products and is especially beneficial. Some varieties also contain probiotic bacteria, which support digestive health. If you’re lactose intolerant, you may also be able to tolerate yogurt Trusted Source, especially probiotic yogurt. Check with your doctor to see if you can test it out. A whole world of yogurt smoothies, parfaits, and lassi could be waiting.

 

Legumes

This group of food includes lentils, peas, beans, chickpeas, soybeans, and peanuts aka all kinds of fabulous recipe ingredients. Legumes are great plant-based sources of fiber, protein, iron, folate, and calcium — all of which your body needs more of during pregnancy. Foliate is one of the most essential B vitamins (B9). It’s very important for you and the baby, especially during the first trimester, and even before. You’ll need at least 600 micrograms (mcg) of folate every day, which can be a challenge to achieve with foods alone. But adding in legumes can help get you there along with supplementation based on your doctor’s recommendation. Legumes are generally very high in fiber, too. Some varieties are also high in iron, magnesium, and potassium. Consider adding legumes to your diet with meals like hummus on whole-grain toast, black beans in a taco salad, or lentil curry.

 

Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes are not only delicious cooked about a thousand ways, but they’re also rich in beta carotene, a plant compound that is converted into vitamin A in your body. Vitamin A is essential for a baby’s development. Just watch out for excessive amounts of animal-based sources of vitamin A, such as organ meats, which can cause toxicity Trusted Source in high amounts. Thankfully, sweet potatoes are an ample plant-based source of beta carotene and fiber. Fiber keeps you full longer, reduces blood sugar spikes, and improves digestive health (which can really help if that pregnancy constipation hits).

Eggs

Those incredible, edible eggs are the ultimate health food, as they contain a little bit of almost every nutrient you need. A large egg contains about 80 calories, high-quality protein, fat, and many vitamins and minerals. Eggs are a great source of choline, a vital nutrient during pregnancy. It’s important in a baby’s brain development and helps prevent developmental abnormalities of the brain and spine. A single whole egg contains roughly 147 milligrams (mg) of choline, which will get you closer to the current recommended choline intake of 450 mg per day while pregnant (though more studies are being done to determine if that is enough).

Here are some of the healthiest ways to cook eggs. Try them in spinach feta wraps or a chickpea scramble.

Broccoli and dark, leafy greens

Broccoli and dark, green vegetables, such as kale and spinach, pack in so many of the nutrients you’ll need. Even if you don’t love eating them, they can often be squirreled into all kinds of dishes. Benefits include fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, calcium, iron, folate, and potassium. They’re a bonanza of green goodness. Adding in servings of green veggies is an efficient way to pack in vitamins and fend off constipation due to all that fiber. Vegetables have also been linked to a reduced risk of low birth weight

Whole grains

Unlike their refined counterparts, whole grains are packed with fiber, vitamins, and plant compounds. Think oats, quinoa, brown rice, wheat berries, and barley instead of white bread, pasta, and white rice. Some whole grains, like oats and quinoa, also contain a fair amount of protein. They also hit a few buttons that are often lacking in pregnant people: B vitamins, fiber, and magnesium. There are so many ways to adds whole grains to any meal, but we’re especially liking this quinoa and roasted sweet potato bowl

Avocados

Avocados are an unusual fruit because they contain a lot of monounsaturated fatty acids. This makes them taste buttery and rich — perfect for adding depth and creaminess to a dish. They’re also high in fiber, B vitamins (especially folate), vitamin K, potassium, copper, vitamin E, and vitamin C. Because of their high content of healthy fats, folate, and potassium, avocados are a great choice during pregnancy (and always). The healthy fats help build the skin, brain, and tissues of your little one, and folate may help prevent neural tube defects, developmental abnormalities of the brain and spine such as spina bifida. Potassium may help relieve leg cramps, a side effect of pregnancy for some women. In fact, avocados contain more potassium Trusted Sources than bananas.

Dried fruit

Dried fruit is generally high in calories, fiber, and various vitamins and minerals. One piece of dried fruit contains the same amount of nutrients as fresh fruit, just without all the water and in a much smaller form. One serving of dried fruit can provide a large percentage of the recommended intake of many vitamins and minerals, including folate, iron, and potassium. Prunes are rich in fiber, potassium, and vitamin K. They’re natural laxatives and may be very helpful in relieving constipation. Dates are high in fiber, potassium, iron, and plant compounds. However, dried fruit also contains high amounts of natural sugar. Make sure to avoid the candied varieties, which contain even more sugar. Although dried fruit may help increase calorie and nutrient intake, it’s generally not recommended to consume more than one serving at a time.

Water

We all have to stay hydrated. During pregnancy, blood volume increases by about 45 percent. Your body will channel hydration to your baby, but if you don’t watch your water intake, you may become dehydrated yourself. Symptoms of mild dehydration include headaches, anxiety, tiredness, bad mood, and reduced memory. Increasing your water intake may also help relieve constipation and reduce your risk of urinary tract infections, which are common during pregnancy. General guidelines recommend that pregnant women drink about 80 ounces (2.3 liters) of water daily. But the amount you really need varies. Check with your doctor for a recommendation based on your specific needs. Keep in mind that you also get water from other foods and beverages, such as fruit, vegetables, coffee, and tea.

 

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